Confessions of an Anglophile

Published 9/5/13 by:

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You might think that people with Anglophilia want to marry Mick Jagger, get their own accent, or have personalized tea sets. You wouldn’t be terribly off. Anglophilia has grown increasingly popular in America because, well, British people and culture are fascinating. Some may argue that American and British pop culture are eerily similar – we both faint over the Beatles, enjoy a good curry, and want to be BFFS with Adele, but the prestige of our every day living is quite different. This is where my own Anglophilia sets in.

My Anglophilia was developed during middle school when I discovered three things: Led Zeppelin’s albums, how cute Prince William was, and Elton John’s re-write of Candle in the Wind for Princess Diana. It metastasized when I became more aware of how royalty works, and the cruciality of bloodlines. It also helped that my favorite Muppet movie took place in London. So as we welcomed a new heir to the British throne this summer, I began to contemplate whether people’s preoccupation with Britain was monetarily, royally, or pop culturally embedded. Or can we not separate those three things from each other when considering Anglophilia?

Here are my personal conclusions:

I love castles, private jets, palaces, inherited jewelry, Led Zeppelin, The Rolling Stones, The Spice Girls, The Beatles, Princess Diana, Wimbledon, Prince William, Prince Harry, Princess Kate (Duchess of Cambridge), people who have five or six names, people who “titles”, Andy Murray, tea, English muffins, fish and chips, pints, Bowie, Queen, Keep Calm and Carry On, JK Rowling, alternative spellings such as “favourite”, theater and abbeys.

American culture has borrowed so many of these things that we see as esteemed, that I find it hard to believe that more people aren’t willing to admit their Anglophilia.

 

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